Titanic documentary promises ‘jaw-dropping’ reconstruction of sinking as new hi-res debris map is completed.

Work has been completed on the most detailed map to date of the wreckage of the legendary Titanic ocean liner. Details of the the map will be revealed in a forthcoming television documentary, which also promises a 'jaw-dropping' account of what exactly happened on that fateful night 100 years ago

With the 100-year anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic approaching, researchers have announced completion of a new detailed map of the ship’s entire debris field.

The research team hopes it will provide further information about the fateful night in April 1912 when the ocean liner sank after hitting an iceberg in the North Atlantic during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York. More than 1,500 people died in the incident — an incident that has since inspired countless movies and novels.

To help build the high-resolution map, the team used over 100,000 photos taken by underwater cameras and sonar imaging equipment.

“With the sonar map, it’s like suddenly the entire room lit up and you can go from room to room with a magnifying glass and document it,” Titanic historian Parks Stephenson told the Associated Press this week. “Nothing like this has ever been done for the Titanic site.”

The comprehensive map shows hundreds of objects strewn across the ocean floor, and also offers some further clues as to the way in which the enormous vessel sank. For example, marks on the ocean floor appear to suggest that the stern rotated like a helicopter blade as it went down; it had been thought the ship simply plunged straight down. Closer examination of the debris will also give researchers a better idea of how the ship broke apart.

The documentary, which promises to reveal plenty of new information about the tragic fate of this legendary liner, airs on April 15.